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Balanced Fund Financial Glossary

What is it? A fund that seeks both growth and income by investing in a combination of stocks and bonds. These portfolios may offer less growth potential, but they also tend to be less volatile than portfolios that invest only in stocks (see Volatility).

Finance Term Definition Added By: Ashlyn

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